Courses | Negotiating Skills for Information and Library Workers

Negotiating Skills for Information and Library Workers

OBJECTIVES OF THE COURSE

Negotiation is a part of professional and personal life: without it, inclusive decisions cannot be made.  The ability to communicate clearly is at the root of effective negotiation and clear communication depends on self-knowledge: an understanding of personal and professional values of oneself, other team members and, as far as possible, of the other stakeholders.  The aim is to arrive at outcomes that are regarded as being of mutual benefit — not “winning and losing”.

The course intends to increase the ability of LIS staff to engage in high-level negotiations with partners and stakeholders and thereby contribute to the effective management of their Library and Information Services.  Participants will gain essential knowledge and practical skills required to amongst others negotiate with donors, partners and other stakeholders in the public and private sectors to mutual advantage.

OUTCOMES OF THE COURSE

By the end of this workshop, participants should be able to:

  • Define what is particular about reaching agreement within the library environment: public and private partners, collaborating institutions and donors;
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the theoretical aspects regarding negotiation;
  • Determine the objective and phases of negotiation;
  • Identify the information needed for negotiation and decide what, and how much, information should be shared;
  • Identify the gains and losses implicit in each possible outcome;
  • Develop a negotiation strategy;
  • Formulate a course of action;
  • Execute a successful, sustainable negotiation; i.e. identify what constitutes success, what constitutes sustainability and ways to reach consensus and set the conditions of agreement;
  • Deal with donors, partners and other stakeholders in the public and private sectors to mutual advantage.

DURATIONOF THE COURSE: 3 or 2 day course

FACILITATORS: Dr Ben Fouché, Dr Gretchen Smith and Prof Peter Underwood